Paperful office

Locked rooms full of potential secrets was nothing new for a multinational enterprise that a colleague of mine consulted for a few years ago. A new employee stumbling upon one of these rooms, however, was.

What that employee found in his accidental discovery was a bit unusual: a room full of boxes, all of which were full of neatly-filed printouts of what seemed like meeting minutes. Curious about his new find, he asked his coworkers if they knew anyting about this room.

None did.

It took him weeks to find the one person that had a clue about this mysterious room. According to her, one team was asked to summarize their updates every week, and every week, someone printed them out, shipped it to the papers-to-the-metaphoric-ceiling room and categorized it.

Seems strange? This fresh employee thought so. He sought to find out why.

After a few weeks of semi-serious digging, he excavated the history behind this process. Many, many years ago (I’m talking about bring-your-family-into-security-at-the-airport days), an executive was on his way to a far-away meeting and remembered along the way that he forgot to bring a summary of updates for an important team that was to come up in discussion. Panicked, he asked his executive assistant to print it out and bring it to him post haste. She did.

To prevent this from happening again, she printed and filed this update out every week in the room that eventually became the paper jungle gym. She trained her replacement to do this, her replacement trained her replacement; I think you see where this is headed. The convenience eventually became a “rule,” and because we tend to be conformant in social situations, this rule was never contested.

None of those printed updates in that room were ever used.


This has nothing to do with DevOps.

Keep reading.

I’m not sure of what became of that rule (and neither does my colleague). There is one thing I’m sure of, though: tens of thousands of long-lived companies of all sizes have processes like these. Perhaps your company’s deployments to production depend on an approval from some business unit that’s no longer involved with the frontend. Perhaps your company requires a thorough and tedious approval process for new software regardless of its triviality or use. Perhaps your team’s laptops and workstations are locked down as much as a business analyst who only uses their computers for Excel, Word and PowerPoint. (It’s incredible what they can do. Excel itself is a damn operating system; it even includes its own memory manager.)

Some of the simplest technology changes you can make to help your company go faster to market don’t involve technology at all. If you notice a rule or process that doesn’t make sense, it might be worth your while to do your own digging and question it. More people might agree with you than you think.

About Me

I’m a DevOps consultant for ThoughtWorks, a software company striving for engineering excellence and a better world for our next generation of thinkers and leaders. I love everything DevOps, Windows, and Powershell, along with a bit of burgers, beer and plenty of travel. I’m on twitter @easiestnameever and LinkedIn at @carlosindfw.

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