So I’ve tried using configuration management to deploy infrastructure to two different clouds and learned this: whenever you think “it would be great if we could deploy to EC2 with Chef,” use CloudFormation or Terraform instead.

Why? Here are a few reasons that come to mind:

  • CloudFormation/Terraform is easier. Terraform YAML is nicer than CloudFormation JSON, but both are *way* easier than trying to shoehorn Jinja2 (Ansible) or chef-provisioning Ruby to do what you want. Like, hundreds of lines easier.

    I once tried to use Ansible to automate provisioning of Active Directory forests onto EC2. I had to create my own roles for handling AMI selection, security group CRUD operations, EBS provisioning, etc. The 2000+ lines of YAML I wrote to uphold all that bass ultimately became about 200 lines of ugly, yet functional, CloudFormation JSON.

    Yeah.
  • Built-in rollback is awesome. CloudFormation and Terraform both support some kind of rollback. Chef provisioning does as well with the :rollback action (I don’t think Ansible does; at least it didn’t when I used the EC2 plugin), but it’s not guaranteed.
  • I really liked the CloudFormation API. I haven’t tried Terraform’s CLI yet, but I would imagine that it’s just as awesome. aws cloudformation provides a lot of useful information that’s easy to action upon in a Chef recipe or Ansible play, especially given that both platforms have support for CloudFormation “built-in.” What’s better, the AWS SDKs have full support for CloudFormation as well, which means…
  • You’re not locked into anything. This was the biggest takeaway from my experiences using chef-provisioning or ansible-ec2. If you ever decide to move away from Chef or Ansible, you’ll need to port over your deployment code with it. Depending on the platform, this could take anywhere from hours to weeks.

    Not a problem with CloudFormation or Terraform. Perhaps you’ll need to change how your Chef shell resource behaves, but that’s a lot easier to deal with, in my opinion.

Using your config management solution to do it all is really attractive. It’s usually not a bad idea either. However, when it comes to cloud, tread carefully!

About Me

Carlos Nunez is a DevOps consultant for ThoughtWorks, a software company striving for engineering excellence and a better world for our next generation of thinkers and leaders. He loves everything DevOps, Windows, and Powershell, along with a bit of burgers, beer and plenty of travel.

Follow him on Twitter! @easiestnameever.

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